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The Decline of the Building

The Concrete Structure Reinforced concrete is not as durable as it looks. If left unprotected, it is prone to various forms of contamination which in turn give rise to corrosion in the steel bars embedded within it. These steel bars give reinforced concrete its strength. Rust expands along them forming...

Who lived at Embassy Court?

Alas, there is little solid evidence that many of the famous celebrities popularly associated with the building ever leased flats or took up permanent residence here. The novelist, playwright and columnist Keith Waterhouse certainly lived at Embassy Court for many years. Actors and entertainers Rex...

Embassy Court in the Courts

The sale of long leases was a key feature of the growth in UK home ownership in the 1960s and 70s. But imbalances were inherent in the legal frame work that supported this system. In a large block of flats like Embassy Court, the conversion from short to long leases shifts the location of value from the...

Wells Coates and Modernism

Coates was a key figure in the development of the first phase of British Modernism. A Canadian national brought up in Japan he seems typical of the invigorating spirit that entered British cultural life in the 1930s. Energetic, driven, beholden to no-one, capable of a deep idealism whose seriousness was...

The Embassy Court Mural

The Britain of the 1930s saw an influx of writers, intellectuals, artists and architects escaping totalitarian regimes in Europe. Mingled with talent from the Empire and dominions, new ideas, methods, artistic and social values jolted Britain into a cultural life that could hardly have been imagined by...

Embassy Court in the 1930s

Embassy Court was not just home to the wealthy and famous. The luxury lifestyle on offer required the presence of up to 40 staff a number of whom had accommodation on site. Like the last English country houses of the 1930s the presence of maids, butlers and other servants was incorporated into the...

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